Press Release 4-28-08
IT TAKES A VILLAGE TO MAKE A MOVIE
Producer Creates New Genre of Motion Picture

In today's times, it is quite an achievement to do something in the
motion picture field that hasn't been done before, but it appears that
an attorney from Natchitoches, Louisiana has done just that.
"Well, that's what I keep hearing." producer / director Payne Williams
comments, "It didn't start out that way, but I'm really proud of the
movie that came out of everyone's effort,
and yes, it was my first time, too."

As it turns out, it was everyone's first time to act. Almost one
hundred-fifty participates, and no one with any acting experience.

"One cast member," Williams continues, "Jaque Horton was a
lighting stand-in for Dolly Pardon when Steel Magnolias was made here,
and that was the most experienced actor we had. I cast The Garden Club
from people I knew who were characters in their own right,
people that I thought their personality would come through on camera."

Based on a novel, The Garden Club is about the social status
of small town Southern women and how greed and a thirst
for power is just beneath the surface in all of us. The book was
written by Natchitoches native Robert DeBlieux, who is now a member of
the acting troupe Williams formed for the project.
"The Cane Lake Players are just regular people who got together for
this project because they believed they could do it. I will say this,
acting is a lot harder than it looks."

"I call it a Community Theater Motion Picture." Daniel Graves,
the director of photography for the project comments, "Payne has done something here that hasn't been done before. Every town in America
is full of faces and characters that would look great on camera,
but they've never dreamed of actually being in a movie.
In the atmosphere he created, Payne got these people to forget
that they didn't know what they were doing,
and just go with it.
A lot of pressure is forgotten when you're not in front of an audience,
and you know you can do another take if you flub your lines."

Graves and editor Dennis Murdock were the only people with
industry experience on the project. " I've been producing
documentaries for about twenty years and Dennis has been in
the business for thirty." Graves continues, "We were both amazed
with some of the performances that were turned in by this group,
and I think every audience that sees the picture will get a real kick
out of it whether they've heard the actors names before or not."